thinking aloud

A Journal Through Advocacy and Creativity

03
Dec 2019
Speaker for the Dead. In her book, Staying with the Trouble, ‘multispeciest feminist theorist’ (Duke University Press 2016) Donna Haraway references an Orson Wells science-fiction novel, The Speaker for The Dead. (Haraway 2016 p68). In it, a man collects the stories of the dead insectoid alien life forms killed in a cross-species war. Haraway considers this in context of an extinct bee species and the surviving bee-mimicking orchids who are dependent upon the bee for pollination. The orchid remembers the bee and a person will remember the orchid when its time comes. ‘The task of the Speaker for the Dead... TELL ME MORE
06
Dec 2019
The story of Little Red Riding Hood is most probably the world’s most retold tale (Beckett 2008 p1) and if that is so, the killing of the wolf is told many, many times over, in many cultures and languages. So, just how does illustration handle the tricky subject of the killing of a wolf? How does story-telling make it possible to kill off, without reprieve, one of its main characters, and what is illustration's role in the process? Is there another picture book character whose life is so easily wiped out over and over, who is made so reprehensible that... TELL ME MORE
30
Nov 2019
This is a board book for young children. Here in comic form, the wolf has become his own shadow. French illustrator Barroux’s wolf stands human-like; he is devoid of detail. The high contrast draws the reader to the wolf yet he is also obscure and indistinct. Through colour and composition, there is a visual bond between the girl and the trees; they lean, as one object, away from the wolf. Visually the wolf does not belong; he isn’t positively connected to any other elements on the page. In the next image, the wolf is dead, he’s been shot. If you... TELL ME MORE
16
May 2019
Studying research and practice became easier as I did it; I became more comfortable with the language and terminology of research, and connecting research to learning, through practice and back to research again. The more I enjoyed it, the easier it became easier to focus on a particular part of research. I have struggled with focus. I go through highs and lows with it, unable to focus or sit still followed by periods of deep hyperfocus. It is helpful to recognise this and the triggers for getting me out of periods of procrastination. Because of this, I crave peer group... TELL ME MORE
14
May 2019
Case studies are a way of exploring the work of inspiring illustration and illustrators. Investigations can reveal how marks were made, what medium was used and can give insight into expereinces and motivations of established artists. Exploring examples is a crucial part of the research process.  E.H. Gombrich explains changes in style, through art history, as one consequence of artists learning from each other. Herring, et al. (2009) conclude, '... that examples are a cornerstone of creative practice ...' The following is a case study investigation into the work of Henrik Drescher. Aims of research The aim of this case... TELL ME MORE
07
May 2019
Movement: One topic, different perspectives   Movement. What do you think of when you hear, read or say the word movement? Word connections can help generate ideas around a topic like this. This mini-project proposal looks at ideas for research in to movement and acts as a catalyst to trigger new thinking.  Proposal summary If we consider the concept of movement in picture books, it is there in the illustrations and characterisations, in the shape and line and form of the drawings. Movement is visible through composition and position, repetition and scale on the page. Wavy lines, blurs and character... TELL ME MORE
07
May 2019
I started this blog as part of my MA in Illustration, (programme of Art and Design). Therefore, it will reflect my research and practice, and academic learning. In addition, I am an animal advocate, and my goals for illustration revolve around that and some existential wondering. This is also for anyone who may be seeking an ally in illustration for advocacy. TELL ME MORE
06
May 2019
Idea generation is vital for progressing an idea, for developing illustrations and illustrative style. Ideas develop through research which inspires practice, and in turn, experimental practice acts as another form of research. Pecha Kucha is a form of presentation that takes the form of 20 slides, each on screen for 20 seconds with an accompanying narration. Here, that format presents examples of idea generation and experimental practice for research. TELL ME MORE

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